2 Climbing Rangers Encourage Responsible Recreation At East Side Climbing/Bouldering Areas

 

The Eastern Sierra Interpretive Association (ESIA) has hired two climbing rangers to patrol the increasingly popular climbing and bouldering areas in the Bishop area. This is the third year of the program.

Climbing in the Eastern Sierra is an interagency activity, so the climbing rangers are supported by numerous partners: the  Bishop Area Climbers Coalition, Bishop Area of Chamber of Commerce, Friends of Inyo, Los Angeles Department of Power and Water, Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office and the Inyo National Forest.

The rangers will be focused on the Tablelands, Happys and Sads, the Buttermilks, Pine Creek, the Gorge and Upper Gorge, and the Druids.

One the of main goals is for the rangers is to provide education to climbers about where to park and camp, leave no trace principles, and climbing etiquette. Events like climber coffees will help develop a community forum for climbers in the area.

The climbing rangers will also track visitor use patterns including documenting parking and camping uses and tracking changes.

Lastly, the rangers will oversee restoration and stewardship activities such as campsite clean-up, trail delineation, educational signage, planting native plants in heavily used areas, etc. They will help coordinate volunteer events and look to remedy issues such as off-road travel and otherwise recommend long -term solutions to increasing use patterns.

Ranger Bios:

Timothy Golden: Tim is excited to encourage responsible and respectful use of natural and cultural landscapes. Tim is the co-founder and former Director of Special Projects for the Bishop Area Climbers Coalition (BACC), and so very familiar with the realities of climbing usage in Bishop. With BACC, Tim completed the Economic Impact of Climbing study for the Bishop Area in partnership with Eastern Kentucky University. During the data collection process of the study, he worked with the climbing rangers to collect car counts and other relevant use data. He worked with a  team of local climber volunteers to survey visiting climbers.

Tim led numerous projects with the BACC including a Digital Event Series to benefit a local area non-profit to organizing the first coalition meeting with LADWP and a follow-up proposal intent on building a long-term relationship.

Tim was a president of the Bay Area Climbers Coalition. In that role, he supported the organization and execution of numerous stewardship projects – which included organizing volunteer teams in trail-building, graffiti removal, and re-bolting.

Tim is a member of Inyo County Search and Rescue. 

Savanna Deger: Savanna grew up in Yosemite National Park, where she learned to place a high value on understanding the intertwined relationship between outdoor recreation and environmental stewardship.

She earned a B.S. in Environmental Education & Interpretation, where she gained the skills to promote and facilitate environmental stewardship projects, connect visitors to resources, and provide high-quality interpretive programs. As a passionate climber and naturalist, the Eastern Sierra is the perfect place put these skills to use while staying close her roots.

At the Mono Lake Committee, she co-led programs using an assortment of interpretive techniques with youth from various backgrounds and tailored her message and conveyed ecological problems and how they related to our audience.

As a ranger with the US Forest Service and National Park Service, she has engaged visitors of all backgrounds in tough discussions about appropriate behavior and Leave No Trace principles.

 

 

17 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
trackback
Damavand Trekking Tour : Mountaineering and outdoor news from here and abroad – 12/9/21 | Mr Damavand
1 month ago

[…] – In late November, a team launched a new lineup at the summit of Smerlda. Line, Moonlight Serendipity (WI2 M5 + 1200ft), connects ditches and ice spots on the northeastern front of the peak. To read about climbing and see photos, click here. Sierra:– The Sierra Wave reports that… Read more »

trackback
2 Climbing Rangers Encourage Responsible Recreation At East Side Climbing/Bouldering Areas - Bishop Visitor Information Center
1 month ago

[…] Article by Sierra Wave […]

Robert
Robert
1 month ago

More people equals more pressure on the area. It’s not going to get better, it’s going to get worse. You can bank on it.

Masked Locals
Masked Locals
1 month ago

Growing populations always means less freedoms. There will always be a certain percentage of the population that will be naughty or flat out pigs. Larger populations also mean larger governments to keep things from getting too outa hand. Someone must pay for these services which usually means user permits, shuttle… Read more »

bill
bill
1 month ago
Reply to  Masked Locals

I have a US government topographical map dated 1949 that call the area you are talking about as buttermilk country not the buttermilks.

Local 4 ever
Local 4 ever
1 month ago
Reply to  bill

Sorry not sorry your sensibilities are offended by the colloquial adoption by a different user group.

mono resident
mono resident
1 month ago
Reply to  Local 4 ever

take things personally, do you?

Local 4 ever
Local 4 ever
1 month ago
Reply to  bill

You’ll be horrified to know that in addition to using “the Buttermilks” to refer to a specific area within Buttermilk Country ( which are plural boulders) these heathens have NAMED THE INDIVDUAL BOULDERS! Oh, the impropriety!

Blob
Blob
1 month ago
Reply to  Local 4 ever

Don’t worry about my sensibilities being offended. Just wondering where you herd the term “the buttermilks”?

Blob
Blob
1 month ago
Reply to  Local 4 ever

Sorry Local 4 ever, my question was not to you but thanks for your thoughts.

Visiting
Visiting
1 month ago

I’m only posting to state that I read the article, gave the first commenter David Dennison an up vote, only to see it register as a down vote. Not encouraging…

David Dennison
David Dennison
1 month ago
Reply to  Visiting

Visiting To explain what I mean by my post,not trying to be negative,and if it is friendly visits and suggestions to climbers,I’m all for it. But I’ve had past problems with camphosts,even USFS employees banging on my camper window at 9 P.M. asking in a mean way “if I paid… Read more »

David Dennison
David Dennison
1 month ago

Don’t want to sound to negative,but I hope this idea works out for the best. At times,it seems way to much governing of things and activities,not only here in the Sierra,but other places outdoors too with just about everything one chooses to do without “big brother” maybe showing up offering… Read more »

Vaguely
Vaguely
1 month ago
Reply to  David Dennison

David, nice sentiment, but it is rare when government acknowledges limits. Get the camel’s nose under the tent and you’re done for.

Remember the Alabamas
Remember the Alabamas
1 month ago
Reply to  David Dennison

Dennis, remember the spring, summer and fall of 2020 when so many public lands were overrun with legal and illegal camping, illegal campfires, trash, torn up landscape, and people pooping all over? Your precious Alabama Hills you commented on so often? Didn’t you want someone out there to keep people… Read more »

David Dennison
David Dennison
1 month ago

Alabamas I do remember the Alabama Hills,this year and last…and how it was over-run by tourists. But like I’m trying to say,maybe these climbing areas do need enforcement and an eye on people dumping trash and pooping everywhere. If the enforcement is handled correctly. I’m all for enforcement of rules… Read more »

Jacque
Jacque
1 month ago
Reply to  David Dennison

This program has been in place for a few years….