Former bank manager in federal court on embezzlement charge

Roxanna Foley, former ESCB manager in Bridgeport.

Roxanna Foley, former ESCB manager in Bridgeport.

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE           (From Mono County District Attorney’s Office – below is a release from US Attorney)

On April 23, 2013, Roxanna Foley, of Bridgeport, was rearrested by Federal Agents after an Indictment was handed down in Federal Court on April 19, 2013.  With the assistant of the Mono County District Attorney’s Office and local law enforcement,  Ms Foley was taken back into custody. 

Ms. Foley served as the Branch Manager for the Bridgeport Branch of the Eastern Sierra Community Bank, a subsidiary of Oak Valley Community Bank.  After conducting a joint investigation between Bank Administrators, Mono County District Attorney, Mono County Sheriff’s Department and agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigations.  Ms. Foley was arrested on April 5, 2012.   

In March 2012, Bank Administrators for Oak Valley Community Bank performed a surprise audit in an attempt to account for a large discrepancy in the Branch’s general ledger.  After an extensive accounting was performed along with further investigation it was uncovered that Ms. Foley had allegedly embezzled approximately $320,000.00. 

The Mono County District Attorney’s Office held a felony complaint against Ms. Foley alleging the embezzlement and has subsequently turned the case over to the US Attorney’s Office based on their jurisdiction and request.

 BRIDGEPORT BANK MANAGER ARRAIGNED FOR EMBEZZLEMENT      

(Press Release from U.S. Attorney’s Office Eastern District)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Roxanna Foley, 52, of Bridgeport, was arraigned today in federal court in Sacramento, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

On April 18, 2013, a federal grand jury returned an indictment, charging her with theft and embezzlement by a bank employee. According to the indictment and statements made in court, between October 2011 and March 20, 2012, Foley embezzled approximately $320,000 from the Eastern Sierra Community Bank where she was employed as a manager.

Foley was released today on a $50,000 bond. She is scheduled to appear before United States District Judge Kimberly J. Mueller on May 29, 2013 for a status conference.

If convicted, Foley faces a maximum statutory penalty of 30 years in prison, a $1 million fine, and a five-year term of supervised release. Any sentence, however, would be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables. The charges are only allegations; the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

This case is the product of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Mono County Sheriff’s Department. Assistant United States Attorney Kyle Reardon is prosecuting the case.

, , , ,

71 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Trouble
Trouble
9 years ago

Wow, a reporter not afraid to speak her mind. It’s funny what a reporter not owned by a multi billion dollar corporation can say.

andrew R
andrew R
9 years ago

I was wondering why the people who work on Wall St. When they get caught for inside trading,bilking companys and investors out of millions, seem to get lighter sentances and less fines than this woman who embezzled a lost less than most of the criminals who stick up Wall ST.… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago
Reply to  andrew R

You are so right. No one answered criminally, on Wall St., for nearly sending the world economy off a very steep cliff. American corporations have engaged in unpenalized theft for decades. Check out the union reporter who was the only one to report on a monopolistic crime that endangered national… Read more »

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  andrew R

The problem is proving a criminal act. The nature of the transactions are so complex and risky that proving a loss was due to deliberate criminal activity is very difficult to do unless, as in the LIBOR case where criminal prosecutions are being pursued, you have some text messages, e-mails… Read more »

salblaster
salblaster
9 years ago

for mja. how many laws are there? thats a very complicated question a good place to start is u.s. health and safety code. as of 2006 there is around 200,000 pages of code divided into 51 titles covering everything from bankruptcy to food preperation to fishing licences. if put into… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago
Reply to  salblaster

And, if anyone has a problem with building codes, take a look at the horrendous tragedy in Bangladesh.
Benett Kessler

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  salblaster

But you want a body of laws to regulate the DWP, right? Just asking ……………………

ferdinand lopez
ferdinand lopez
9 years ago

as what seems to be the norm,this theif stole over a quarter million dollars,thats all,prosecute,you dont like the laws dont do the crime or move to another country,adios

Hem
Hem
9 years ago

30 years in prison for embezzling money? No wonder our economy is in the hole. We have to pay taxes to house these people in prison. Murderers have gotten less time in prison.

John
John
9 years ago

The big supporters and lobbyists for incarcerating people in California are the law enforcement agencies; especially prison guards and California Sherriffs Association. Locking people up is big money, and we the taxpayers are footing the bill.

Hem
Hem
9 years ago
Reply to  John

That’s not entirely correct. While Law Enforcement officials do lobby for it with lawmakers, the lawmakers are the ones who make the laws and determinate sentencing changes. And *WE* all vote for the lawmakers to take office who lobby on the “get tough on crime” when they run for office.

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  John

Maybe law enforcement supports long prison sentences because they are sick and tired of having to re-arrest the same dirt bags over and over again, because we don’t put the garbage away long enough? Ya think? Maybe they are tired of seeing people victimized, meaning shot in drive by shootings,… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago

There are cases of individual redemption. Maybe this is what society should work on.
Benett Kessler

Some cannot think deeply
Some cannot think deeply
9 years ago
Reply to  Benett Kessler

Agreed, Benett. The human spirit of reconciliation and redemption based on compassion is working deep down, whether certain punitive political groups today really know it or not. How sad to come from an ultra-strict father family. You know, “spare the rod and spoil the child” barbaric nonsense. Our basic human… Read more »

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  Benett Kessler

Darn few. Gangs call kids “crash test dummies” because they won’t do hard time for their crimes and prison is “gladiator school”. Gangs are run from the prisons by their jailed “leaders”. You won’t get a lot of redemption from that crowd and basing sentencing laws on some sloppy notions… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago

Cut the rhetoric. Nobody said anything about “sloppy notions” or being “nice to some gang thug.” A view on lawbreakers beyond the simplistic could help a number of people, not to mention society at large. Many individuals have tried work programs that changed inmates. These programs have never been tried… Read more »

Throw em all in jail
Throw em all in jail
9 years ago

After the 2012 election debacle, the consensus among conservatives for moving forward on the throw-em-all-in jail nonsense seems quixotic: develop new policy prescriptions but without compromising foundational principles. Criminal justice reform, however, is perfectly suited for the mission. The model for conservative criminal justice—less spending, better results, accountability, and greater… Read more »

MJA
MJA
9 years ago

How many laws are there,
Can they even be counted,
And where oh where does freedom fit in?

=

Constitutionalists?
Constitutionalists?
9 years ago
Reply to  MJA

I’ve always had a big problem with today’s self-appointed “constitutionalists” Laws here. Laws there. This is wrong .That is right … Where does the madness and authoritarianism end? And now we have those that want to jail people of the same sex who choose to live with each other bothering… Read more »

Tourbillon
Tourbillon
9 years ago

Don’t know what you mean by “Constitutionalist” but the “laws here, laws there” situation is being perpetrated mostly by progressives, who true to form think that the answer to all of life’s problems lies in placing our future in the hands of enlightened “experts” in government agencies regulating our lives… Read more »

Give me someone to vote for
Give me someone to vote for
9 years ago
Reply to  Tourbillon

Tourbillon – Your bitterness regarding the current administration and indeed Democrats in general is showing … again. If your so-called conservative movement can come up with a conservative leader who is acceptable to the majority of Americans and can come across as someone who sound like anything other than Glenn… Read more »

Constitutionalists
Constitutionalists
9 years ago
Reply to  Tourbillon

The far-right believes they and they alone have the right to interpret the Constitution (Constitutionalists).They want to make gay unions illegal, immoral and want to banish gay people from society and like the twist the Constitution and interpret it as following their fascist-sounding guidelines. Ain’t gonna happen. Best mind your… Read more »

and speaking of the Constitution
and speaking of the Constitution
9 years ago

Neoconservative gurus Sean Hannity and Ann Coulter are upset about Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev being read his Miranda rights (a Fifth Amendment issue). These popular spokesperson for the far-right wanted him to be treated as an enemy combatant instead of in a civil court (which would concern the Sixth… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago

An FBI agent speaking to Bill Maher on HBO said terrorist suspects handled in federal court are more often convicted than those thrown over to military court. Miranda doesn’t come and go whether you say it or not. It’s the law, designed to protect the defendant and to make sure… Read more »

Stupid is and stupid does
Stupid is and stupid does
9 years ago
Reply to  Tourbillon

Tourbillon The “stupidity” you are talking about (nice Limbaugh insult though) is thinking that if the neocons want to make gay marriage illegal, somebody is going to go to jail for breaking that law. It’s also “stupid” to get the masses to believe that today’s conservative movement is not law… Read more »

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago

I think you can learn from your own words there Dr. with regard to childish Limbaugh like insults, just feeding the fire.

I do agree to some extent about what you’re saying in this post. But every side does that now days. It’s the norm, slam and be slammed.

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago
Reply to  Tourbillon

I agree Tourbillon.

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago
Reply to  MJA

Don’t you know MJA …. freedom is slowly being faded out. While we do enjoy a lot of freedoms, they are all going away eventually. If we look at Roman history, and Greek history, they both got so big, government started ruling the people instead of taking care of them… Read more »

Odd notion of freedom
Odd notion of freedom
9 years ago
Reply to  Big AL

Right Big Al. Freedom for all … except for… people of the same sex who want to marry, people who want to terminate a pregnancy, freedom to smoke a joint in the privacy of their home if they want, freedom to not be forced into public prayer, freedom to immigrate… Read more »

johnjcampnfish
johnjcampnfish
9 years ago

Well Tibet has only 3 prisons and an incarceration rate of about 88 per 100,000 so maybe that Dally Llama has something going on in his writings. On the other hand, Tibet has about the highest rate of self-immolations in the known universe. And your average follower of the Llama… Read more »

You need to read more
You need to read more
9 years ago
Reply to  johnjcampnfish

Johnjcampnfish, In 1950 His Holiness was called upon to assume full political power after China’s invasion of Tibet in 1949. In 1954, he went to Beijing for peace talks with Mao Zedong and other Chinese leaders, including Deng Xiaoping and Chou Enlai. But finally, in 1959, with the brutal suppression… Read more »

johnjcampnfish
johnjcampnfish
9 years ago

That’s a pretty good gig for a “simple monk”, traveling to the four corners of the globe and visiting 62 countries. But what does he do with embezzlers? Does he make them upgrade his simple monk plane tickets to first class?

an interdependent world
an interdependent world
9 years ago
Reply to  johnjcampnfish

johnjcampnfish – You clearly know nothing about the Dalai Lama and what it is he’s devoted to doing for mankind. A lot also do not. This is understandable in a world gone completely cold and embracing an “it’s all about me” life philosophy with some only focusing on punishment. But… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago

I will also point out that compassion does not mean letting people off the hook. It means looking for a way to deal with them that will make them
better human beings and benefit society.
Benett

The Dalai Lama on imprisonment
The Dalai Lama on imprisonment
9 years ago

During the time he was teaching in New York City in September, 2003, His Holiness the Dalai Lama met privately with a group of former inmates. They told him about their experience in prison. His Holiness later shared his reflections on this meeting when he spoke to the thousands of… Read more »

Tourbillon
Tourbillon
9 years ago

I’m sure the Lama is a nice guy. But as a man whose country is oppressed and dominated by a communist thug regime, the Lama might be expected to have matters occupying his thoughts other than “the purity of the Buddha nature” of rapists and murderers in American prisons. I’m… Read more »

The healing process
The healing process
9 years ago

Tim, thanks for the elaboration. The head-in-the-sand method assists no one. Now the healing wil surely begin.

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago

Ken, you’re right, law enforcement is a big money making business now, including detention, as we see with this link. Look how much money we put into it annually. Home land security is a big business too .. it mandates more law enforcement and detention facilities.

ferdinand lopez
ferdinand lopez
9 years ago

the lady is nothing more than a common theif, and should be punished to the fullest extent of the law

Put everyone in prison
Put everyone in prison
9 years ago

The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world. At year-end 2009, it was 743 adults incarcerated per 100,000 population. The U.S. Congress has ordered federal judges to make imprisonment decisions “recognizing that imprisonment is not an appropriate means of promoting correction and rehabilitation.” Critics have lambasted… Read more »

Wayne Deja
Wayne Deja
9 years ago

There is no such thing as a “victimless crime”…and in most cases, a “non-violent” crime could turn into one in an instant….drug dealers and users usually seize the moment if given the opportunity to do so…which can,and does lead to more violent things,for the user,dealer,or some innocent bystander.I knew of… Read more »

Trouble
Trouble
9 years ago
Reply to  Wayne Deja

Wayne- I would say 99 % of the tickets and arrest in this country are for victimless crimes. There is no victim if no one gets hurt. Who got hurt when I forget to wear my seatbelt? Who got hurt when I answered my cell phone while driving? Who gets… Read more »

Wayne Deja
Wayne Deja
9 years ago
Reply to  Trouble

Trouble……The seat belt law is because some people don’t use common sense…seat belts save a LOT of lives,and prevent serious injuries.Answering,or talking on a cell phone,texting,etc. causes a lot of accidents,and injuries to innocent people.Not coming to a full stop ?…..dangerous…cause chances are when you do that your not looking… Read more »

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago
Reply to  Trouble

Trouble, the trouble is .. not everyone can walk and chew gum at the same time, I agree .. laws like cell phone laws do make some people criminals, like a lot of other laws, most of them are pr-emptive as Wayne is saying .. preventing people from getting hurt,… Read more »

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  Trouble

How many drivers and motorcyclist have been kiiled by drivers failing to obey traffic signs, traffic lights and failed to yield the right of way? Tens of thousands. So cops are picky about you actually stopping at a traffic light or stop sign. Gee, imagine that. How many lives are… Read more »

Hem
Hem
9 years ago
Reply to  Wayne Deja

That’s not entirely accurate. The definition of a victimless crime is when you commit a crime that violates or threatens the rights of others. There are plenty of crimes that are victimless but that doesn’t mean they don’t effect people in some way or another.

Trouble
Trouble
9 years ago
Reply to  Hem

Hem- “or threatens the rights of others”. That statement could land me in jail if I sneezed in a public place if our gov’t wanted it to. We gotta draw a line somewhere on all these nanny rules.

Ken Warner
Ken Warner
9 years ago

Maybe the reason for so many people in jail is that so many people are not willing to abide by the law of the land. The comments in this blog over the last few years demonstrate that daily. Think about all the people who complained about check points or road… Read more »

The We're not tough enough philosophy
The We're not tough enough philosophy
9 years ago
Reply to  Ken Warner

Uh-oh!
Ken and Wayne want some of the posters on this blog to be thrown in jail!

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago
Reply to  Ken Warner

One of the hallmarks of adulthood is accepting responsibility for one’s actions, and an understanding that one is not competely free to do whatever they want whenever they want. “Freedom” also brings with it some obligations to things higher than oneself. We have a class of people posting here who,… Read more »

Big AL
Big AL
9 years ago

Tim, don’t pay attention to the rhetoric. It’s just too bad you had to justify it at length when most everyone got it the first time.

Letting go
Letting go
9 years ago
Reply to  Big AL

Tim, I wish everyone could find the wisdom as you have to delve back into their past to see what it is that’ s been ailing them. Unfortunately, there are those who believe the cavalier approach is the best and only way. These poor souls have not let go of… Read more »

Families and mobiles
Families and mobiles
9 years ago

Tim, Thanks for sharing your feelings rather than keep them bottled up only to fester. Families are like a mobile hanging from the ceiling. When one part of the mobile starts to vibrate, every other part of the mobile starts to vibrate. Then in time, all is calm again. One… Read more »

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

Thank you for the acknowledgement; it has been a tough week with the loss of my close friend who also was also doctor. My parents are both doctors, now in their 90’s, as well as a few of my friends, you can imagine the implications. In caring for the parents… Read more »

Curious
Curious
9 years ago

Ever notice how the greediest of hypocrites, can always justify their own ego’s and even celebrate it as a virtue?

Schadenfreude and karma are not even remotely related,even when they serve up the exact same results.

Hard to look at the photo
Hard to look at the photo
9 years ago
Reply to  Curious

It’s difficult for me to look at the photograph of this lady. All I see in her eyes is a sad and frightened little girl. You wonder what happened in her life to find herself in such a predicament. Her upbringing. The economy. The desperation. Oh, what problems we create… Read more »

J
J
4 years ago

This lady and I attended high school together. We became the best of friends and carried on our friendship many years later. She had a good upbringing. Great family. I knew her as a witty, caring, hard working, family oriented person I enjoyed being around. We fell out of touch… Read more »

Karma and the disturbing mind
Karma and the disturbing mind
9 years ago
Reply to  Curious

The truth of suffering is that we experience many different types of suffering. The three categories are: suffering of suffering-this refers to things such as headaches; suffering of change-this is the feeling of restlessness after being comfortable; and all-pervasive suffering that acts as the basis of the first two categories… Read more »

Tim
Tim
9 years ago

A true story… An East Indian doctor once told me that “the Dali Lama says, it is better to be kind than to be right”. I replied “I like that very much and use a similar saying that goes, “it is better to be comfortable than to be right”. The… Read more »

SIerraFan
SIerraFan
9 years ago
Reply to  Tim

TIm,

Thanks for sharing that story! In the end, the doctor wouldn’t buy his own medicine, that’s great!

Meditation and anger
Meditation and anger
9 years ago
Reply to  Tim

Tim –

“…began to scream at me.”

Reminds me of a popular radio talk-show host.

Some people are having a difficult time today with simple communication skills.
If they only knew what benefits simply sitting quietly and meditating would bring them.

Wayne Deja
Wayne Deja
9 years ago

Have to rely on karma nowdays,because you sure can’t rely on the court system to issue the correct type of justice……most of the time,anyway.

From His Holiness The Dalai Lama
From His Holiness The Dalai Lama
9 years ago
Reply to  Wayne Deja

If in a competitive society you are sincere and honest in some circumstances people may take advantage of you. If you allow someone to do so, he or she will be engaging in an unsuitable action and accumulating bad karma that will harm the person in the future. Thus it… Read more »

Benett Kessler
Benett Kessler
9 years ago

I only wish the real Dalai Lama read this blog and commented.
Benett Kessler

Insight and wisdom
Insight and wisdom
9 years ago
Reply to  Benett Kessler

Agreed.
Unfortunately you may find some irked at his comments because he’s not a white, anglo-saxon, Christian American.
Meanwhile direct quotes from “The Path to Tranquility” just might provide comfort, insight and joy to some.

Ken Warner
Ken Warner
9 years ago
Reply to  Benett Kessler

He’d probably just laugh his ass off….

The True heroes
The True heroes
9 years ago
Reply to  Benett Kessler

People who fight with other human beings out of anger, hatred, and strong emotion, even if they gain victory over their enemies in battle, are not in reality true heroes. What they are doing is slaying corpses, because human beings, being transient, will die. Whether or not these enemies die… Read more »

Dingo
Dingo
9 years ago

Greed is a disease and karma is for real.

What a beautiful world it would be
What a beautiful world it would be
9 years ago
Reply to  Dingo

How right you are, Dingo.
The cause and effect that people experience is karma and some may not experience the down-side of their actions in this lifetime – but sooner or later it will catch up with them.
If only people would understand and live by the law of karma.

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
9 years ago

My karma hit your dogma.

Big Rick OBrien
Big Rick OBrien
9 years ago

320,000…that averages out to about 60 grand a month. Somebodies asleep at the wheel here. Unless I was buying BRAND a new truck every month, I don’t think I could spend that much money. Maybe the Sheriff’s dept. ought to start monitoring the security footage at the Paiute Palace to… Read more »