Inyo National Forest and BLM Fire Restrictions Set to Increase in the Eastern Sierra Effective June 6

BISHOP, Calif. – The Inyo National Forest and Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office will be implementing fire restrictions effective on all Federal lands under their jurisdiction starting Monday, June 6. Seasonal fire restrictions for the Eastern Sierra Region are being implemented in close coordination with other state and local county agencies.

“Due to dry conditions and high fire danger, it is necessary to implement these seasonal fire restrictions,” said Bureau of Land Management Field Manager Jeff Starosta. “We want to protect our visitors, communities, and natural resources from the risk of wildfire. Please do your part to help us minimize fire potential.”

The following restrictions will be in place on both agency lands:

  • No Campfires, briquette/charcoal barbeques, or stove fires are allowed outside of agency-provided fire rings or barbeques at designated developed recreation sites. Dispersed campfires such as rock rings, will no longer be allowed.
  • No Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or in an area at least three feet in diameter barren of all flammable materials.
  • No welding or operating acetylene or other torch with open flame.
  • No motorized vehicles or tools powered by internal combustion engines off designated roads or trails (such as chainsaws or lawn mowers).

Additionally, on Bureau of Land Management lands only:

  • No target shooting, except with a State of California hunting license and in accordance with California hunting regulations.

As always, possessing, discharging or using fireworks or pyrotechnic devices are prohibited across Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands. Additionally, a valid California Campfire Permits is required whenever you operate a stove or fire on these public lands.

There are however, exemptions to these fire restrictions. Please check each agency’s website for their official orders:

Inyo National Forest Order                 BLM Bishop Field Office Order

HELP US PREVENT WILDFIRES 

Residents and visitors are reminded that simple steps can help prevent human-caused fires:

  • Make sure your campfire is dead out! Drown it, stir it, feel it. If it’s not cool to the touch, it isn’t  out.
  • Be sure to maintain your vehicle’s proper tire pressure, ensure adequate tire tread, and check brakes for overheating. Do not drive or park on brush or grass. Do not drag chains while towing.
  • Motorcycles, ATV’s and chainsaws require an approved spark arrestor.
  • Remember that the use of steel-core ammunition, although legal while hunting, can greatly increase the chance of a wildfire if ricocheted off objects such as rocks.

Anyone found guilty of violating a fire prevention order may be fined not more than $100,000 and/or face imprisonment for not more than 12 months. Restitution for total fire suppression and damage costs incurred may be borne by the trespasser.

Help preventwildfires … One Less Spark, One Less Wildfire.

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.  

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

15 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Tinner
Tinner
5 months ago

They’re just talking and telling us what we want to hear, I hope I’m wrong, but they don’t plan on enforcing and fining anything or anyone.

mono resident
mono resident
5 months ago

“….ignitions on Forest Service lands account for fewer than 25% of the most destructive wildfires” https://wildfiretoday.com/2022/02/18/research-suggests-forest-service-lands-not-the-main-source-of-wildfires-affecting-communities/#:~:text=Of%20all%20ignitions%20that%20crossed,started%20due%20to%20human%20activity. and private property owners are free to do whatever they want whenever they want (like cutting brush and mowing dry grass and dragging a box grader around a yard) because a Red Flag Warning… Read more »

BobK
BobK
5 months ago
Reply to  mono resident

No you are not. I have cut fire wood for longer than many of you have been alive and not one fire….that I know of…. has been started by a chain saw or a bullet in Inyo or Toiyabi NF. Even the one that Alpers accused off roaders of starting… Read more »

Moon
Moon
5 months ago
Reply to  mono resident

do you have any idea of how much it cost to fight a wild fire??

mono resident
mono resident
5 months ago
Reply to  Moon

My answer is yes but this question is pertinent to what I said because???????

David Dennison
David Dennison
5 months ago
Reply to  Moon

Moon

I think it’s more important what a wildfire can do to the Wilderness and maybe our little towns and homes….and not so much how much money it costs to fight it and put it out….but maybe just me thinking that way…

David Dennison
David Dennison
5 months ago
Reply to  mono resident

mono resident Problem is,even if the facts you are reporting are accurate,since the 2020 COVID pandemic,it seems many more tourists and campers to our area,to this day. Even with the sky-high gas prices. And,lets face it,MANY of them have no clue what they’re doing when they come camping up here… Read more »

Many Moons Local
Many Moons Local
5 months ago

Doable restrictions for all. Now we just need the enforcement of these restrictions for those who are irresponsible, or uneducated about fire prevention/hunting, and or the mindless, selfish don’t care about anything or anyone except their own desire’s law breaking rascals.

BobK
BobK
5 months ago

So does this mean that firewood gathering (with a chain saw ) is closed until at least Sept starting on Monday the 6th?

Vaguely
Vaguely
5 months ago

“Reimagine your public lands”. Oh but we are. “Our” public lands are now places where if you smoke a cigarette in the wrong spot, “our” bureaucrats will fine you $100,000 and throw you in jail.

daytripper
daytripper
5 months ago
Reply to  Vaguely

Smoking is bad for you. And the forest.

Dark Watcher
Dark Watcher
5 months ago
Reply to  Vaguely

No one has the right to endanger public lands, other visitors, adjacent private property, etc., by carelessly igniting an unintended wildfire by doing something as optional as smoking a cigarette. Behave in a smart, respectful manner or keep off of OUR public lands.

Tinner
Tinner
5 months ago
Reply to  Vaguely

GOOD!
Sorry if you’re one of the few that properly discards of his/her smokes.

David Dennison
David Dennison
5 months ago
Reply to  Tinner

Tinner

Agree…
Unfortunatly,I’m a smoker.
But in my 23 years living in the OV,not a single butt thrown on the ground.
In fact when camping and/or fishing,I pick up others butts I see along the way,usually coming back to the campsite with a pocket-full of filters….

McJiggles
McJiggles
5 months ago
Reply to  David Dennison

What’s with the downvotes on someone doing something decent?